Friday, March 10, 2017

Minifigs - 18th Century



 Here's a few of the 18th Century "Lego" minifigs which I've done.  I put Lego in quotation marks because a true Lego Pirate range Imperial faction soldier for the period looks like this:



A tricorne, stock torso with lapels & crossbelts, add a musket or sword and call it a day.  My approach is different.  And a lot more time consuming, I must admit.  In fact, the prep work takes darned near as long as the paint job. The figures start with these materials:




To my eyes, a stock Lego minifig comes up lacking in 18th Century style.  The bulky coats and cuffs of the early 1700's are more the look that I wanted.  The cones are used to create the cuffs.  Drilled these out with a Dremel tool and bisected.  The Indiana Jones messenger pouch when cut down works quite nicely for the cartridge box.  Waist belt front and back is styrene.  From the waist down the coat is made of cardstock.

The stock Lego musket is toylike but scales out better than the more realistic BrickWarriors or BrickArms replicas. Also, the curve of the stock allows it be grasped by a minifig's inflexible hands.  Added a bayonet, cut the sword length down and re-attached to the hilt.  There you have it.

And several as completed, above and below.





Having run short of the messenger pouches, I used the downtime to create an officer.  Lego has a lot of women's hair accessories, this curly one makes a serviceable periwig. For the rank & file, I used ponytail parts combined with green stuff.



Coming soon, flats !

16 comments:

  1. The results are worth the effort. The figures are very appealing.

    Lego does make a Periwig for its English judge and a hairpiece with queue and side curls for its Revolutionary War soldier.

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    1. Thanks, Rahway. Yes, I have that judge wig. I'm saving it for use with a general figure.

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  2. Really splendid - beautifully done, and great fun. Brightened my morning - thanks!

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    1. Thanks very much. It's gratifying to make someone's morning many time zones away.

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  3. Delightful figures!

    Its an interesting display of how a few key details are all that are needed to completely change a generic figure into an instantly recognized particular one.

    Of course one needs the eye to see what must be done and the talent to carry it off but you have both.

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    1. Thanks very much for your observation, Ross.

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    1. Thanks, tradgardmastare. Glad you like them.

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  5. Absolutely brilliant! I love 'thinking out of the box' stuff, and these are just superb!

    H

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    1. Thanks very much, Hugh. I'm a fan of your encyclopedia of toys.

      I've just built and primer coated a grenadier (grenade tossing pose) and a cavalry trooper, should have them painted and ready to photograph before long.

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    2. I'll look out for him, but given the limitation of 'leading construction toy' figure's arms, it'll all be in the painting to stop him looking like a Ballet Dancer!

      Not putting you on the spot or anything...

      H

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    3. Haha, no worries, Hugh. He is a properly fearsome grenadier.

      I agree about the limitations. I would've liked to see the figures designed with articulation at the knees and elbows. But then they would've been something else, like GI Joe. At the very least, the squared off legs could have been improved upon. I get the utility of stud holes in back but rounding the front would have made for a better aesthetic.

      I suppose the purpose of the figures was to augment the buildings and not vice versa, thus if we choose to work with them, it means embracing the limitations and making something of it.

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  6. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1152442456/warchu

    u guys see this

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